Onglet Marine au Raifort et Noix

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium red onions, diced
  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup flat leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/3 cup (80ml) creamy style horseradish
  • ¼ cup (25g) walnuts, lightly toasted, minced
  • 1 pound (500g) hanger steak
  • 1 cup (250ml) robust red wine, such as a Cabernet Franc from the Languedoc
  • 2 bay leaves from the Laurus nobilis (or dried imported bay leaves)
  • Lovage or celery leaves for garnish

 

  1. Place 1 tablespoon of the oil and the onions in a medium skillet over medium heat and stir. Cook the onions until they are translucent through and soft, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently so they don’t turn golden. Season to taste with salt and pepper, remove from the heat, and cool.
  2. Mince the parsley.
  3. In a small bowl mix together the parsley, the horseradish, and the walnuts. Taste for seasoning, and adjust.
  4. Cut the hanger steak crosswise into two equal-sized portions, then slice down the center of each steak but not all the way through it, so that you can open the steaks like a book. Spread one-third of the horseradish mixture inside of each steak. Place one-third of the cooked onions atop the horseradish mixture in each hangar steak, and season with pepper. Close the steaks over the filling, as though you were closing a book, pushing any onions inside the steak if they threaten to ooze out.
  5. Spread the remaining third of the horseradish on top of one of the hangar steaks, season it with salt and pepper, and top it with the remaining onions. Set the other hangar steak on top, pressing the two firmly together. Tie the steaks together with kitchen string, to create what looks like a beef roast.
  6. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
  7. Rub the remaining tablespoon of olive oil all over the roast, and place it in a roasting pan. Pour the wine and ½ cup (125ml) of water into the pan, add the bay leaves, and place the pan in the center of the oven. Roast until the meat is golden on the outside, but still quite rare on the inside, for about 20 minutes. Check the steak after 10 minutes to be sure there is enough liquid around it—add an additional ½ cup (125ml) water if necessary. Remove from the oven and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes before cutting, to allow the cooking juices to retreat back into the meat.
  8. Transfer the steak to a cutting board. Place the roasting pan over medium heat and bring the cooking juices to a boil. Reduce the juices until they are syrupy—there should be about ¼ cup (60ml). Taste for seasoning, and keep warm.
  9. Remove the strings from the steak, and cut into thick (½-inch) slices. (The slices will fall apart—arrange them nicely on the plate). Place three lovage or celery leaves in the center of four warmed plates. Arrange two slices of steak atop the leaves then drizzle the slices with the reduced cooking juices. Season with fleur de sel and serve.

4 servings

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