Back from California to a gorgeous, cold, sunny Parisian day then Boom!  Awash with rain.  So, I’m doing what any sane person would, and filling the house with the glorious scent of roasting chicken.  It’s one of the best tonics I know to scare away the post-California sun doldrums!

Here is how I do it.  Don’t be offended or otherwise shocked; chickens have heads, and we buy them with here in France. Happy Preparation!

Seasoning the cavity with salt and pepper after removing the giblets.

Seasoning the cavity with salt and pepper after removing the giblets.

Adding the lemon, cut in half, to the cavity, then adding the giblets.

Adding the lemon, cut in half, to the cavity, then adding the giblets.

Separating the skin from the meat - carefully - so you can slip bay leaves under the skin.

Separating the skin from the meat – carefully – so you can slip bay leaves under the skin.

Slipping the trussing string under the chicken

Slipping the trussing string under the chicken

The first tie

The first tie

Securing the legs

Securing the legs

Crossing the string under the back

Crossing the string under the back

Securing the wings and the neck

Securing the wings and the neck

Trussed chicken

Trussed chicken

Pouring water into roasting pan.

Pouring water into roasting pan.  This prevents juices from burning.  Not too much water; just want the pan moist.

Et voila! A dinner of perfectly roasted,perfectly presented chicken

Et voila! After 1 hour in a 450F (230C) oven, making sure the pan is never completely dry, you have a dinner of perfectly roasted, perfectly presented chicken.  At this point, squeeze over the half lemons used to stuff the chicken. The juice combines with the cooking juices to make an amazing sauce.

BON APPETIT!

 

 

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11 Responses to Roast Chicken Antidote

  1. Anita C. Lee says:

    Glad you’re back home all safe and sound. These pictures and comments inspire me.

    • Susan says:

      Anita, Yes, Home, Safe, Sound, Rainy. Though actually, today it’s gorgeous again. Must be the roast chicken!

  2. Chris says:

    I love it. I’m so glad I found you. Great meeting you at Warwicks. I usually do my roast chickens in my clay pot.

    • Susan says:

      Chris – I’m glad you found me too! I’m glad I found YOU!
      Clay pot chicken is wonderful, I’m sure. But try this – you’ll love it.

  3. Nancy in Alberta says:

    Good antidote! Do you ever put fat on the skin before cooking? Or does that just contribute to more fat in the juices?
    I have taken your method to heart ie. adding pepper & salt, plus a cut lemon to the cavity. So good!

    • Susan says:

      Hello, Nancy – I don’t add fat because it doesn’t need it. I do, however, slip butter under the skin of a turkey when I roast it, but that’s a different story! Bon App!

  4. Curious about the ultimate fate of the chicken head. Is it removed before service?

    • Susan says:

      Lori – I laughed out loud at this. Depends on who is coming for dinner. Normally, I “debite” the chicken, that is cut it up, before serving and the head goes to the trash. But sometimes, a humorous student will use the head to decorate the platter.

    • Susan says:

      Lori – I didn’t answer the question about the chicken head. Usually presented, rarely eaten!

  5. I am grateful chicken doesn’t come with the head in the U.S… although I think it would create some great conversation around the dinner table.

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