The stuffed potatoes

Stuffed potatoes.  Is there anything more glorious sounding.

START WITH THE RIGHT POTATO

The potatoes here are a sweet, tender baking potato called Ramos, which is similar to a Yukon Gold. We get them year round.  Now, of course, along with the last of the 2016 harvest, which is still firm and delicious, we’re getting tiny new potatoes too.  Choose the larger ones of those to stuff with spring onions, bay leaf, and an ample amount of garlic. To sweeten it all, add some maple syrup.

THE MAGIC OF MAPLE SYRUP

Maple syrup may seem like a changeling here, but it really isn’t.  French chefs discovered – or made popular – maple syrup more than a decade ago.   A typical upscale restaurant dish was soft-boiled egg with a generous drizzle of syrup poured over it.

That was the beginning.  There has always been a love affair between the French and the Canadian state of Quebec; history and the old French spoken there attest to that. Since one of Quebec’s signature ingredients is maple syrup, plenty of it came to France in suitcases after visitors tasted it there.  So the French have every reason to include it in their cuisine.  And it’s surprisingly easy to find – I can get it at any supermarket, and there’s even an organic variety at our local organic grocery.

CLASSES FOR FALL AND SPRING ARE NOW OPEN FOR RESERVATIONS.  COME JOIN US IN THE KITCHEN

FRESH BAY LEAVES ARE KEY BUT YOU CAN USE DRIED

So, all of the ingredients here are simple to find. If you don’t have a bay tree (laurus nobilis) and can’t procure fresh bay leaves, then use the dried version, from Turkey.  Just add one instead of three to each potato, as their flavor is more concentrated.  Then, remind yourself to purchase a bay tree – grow it on a balcony, on a terrace, in a garden in almost every climate.  The flavor of the leaves in indescribable.

I like these smoky potatoes, and use aluminum foil to protect them from too much browning. If you’re using a gas grill, put some wood chips right on the burners to create the smoke effect.

I serve these potatoes with pork chops dressed with olive oil and Herbes de Provence

HAVE YOU READ WHAT FOOD52 HAS SAID ABOUT ON RUE TATIN CLASSES.  SO HONORED TO HAVE BEEN NAMED ONE OF THE TOP 7 COOKING CLASSES IN FRANCE.  

Bon Appétit

Print Recipe
POTATOES WITH ONIONS AND MAPLE SYRUP POMMES DE TERRE AUX OIGNONS ET SIROP D’ERABLE
The French are artists with the potato, and here this wonderful tuber is taken to new heights. Brushed with oil and maple syrup, infused with garlic, onion and bay leaf, it is one of the best possible side-dishes I can think of. If you’re not in the mood for meat or poultry, one or two of these potatoes makes a fine main course. They are simple to prepare, out of the ordinary, and they appeal to everyone. ASTUCE: the cooking time will vary depending on the size and freshness of the potato. Also, I ADORE bay leaves. If you love them but don’t adore them, you may use fewer (or more!!!). And should you have any leftover potatoes, dice them up, add some bacon and serve them for…an American breakfast or a French first course! Special Equipment: tongs, aluminum foil
POTATOES WITH ONIONS AND MAPLE SYRUP POMMES DE TERRE AUX OIGNONS ET SIROP D’ERABLE
Servings
Ingredients
  • 4 medium potatoes about 5 ounces; 150g each
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 medium-sized onions about 4 ounces; 120g each cut into 8 thick slices
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 12 fresh or dried from Turkey bay leaves
  • 1 cup wood chips your preference for type of wood
Servings
Ingredients
  • 4 medium potatoes about 5 ounces; 150g each
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 medium-sized onions about 4 ounces; 120g each cut into 8 thick slices
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 12 fresh or dried from Turkey bay leaves
  • 1 cup wood chips your preference for type of wood
POTATOES WITH ONIONS AND MAPLE SYRUP POMMES DE TERRE AUX OIGNONS ET SIROP D’ERABLE
Instructions
  1. Wash the potatoes, and make three partial cuts in each, crosswise. Be careful not to cut through the potatoes.
    Wash the potatoes, and make three partial cuts in each, crosswise. Be careful not to cut through the potatoes.
  2. Using a pastry brush, paint the exterior of the potato and inside of the cuts with olive oil, then with the maple syrup. Season with salt and pepper, making sure some of the seasoning gets inside the cuts. Rub the minced garlic over the potatoes, pushing some of it into the cuts in the potatoes.
    Using a pastry brush, paint the exterior of the potato and inside of the cuts with olive oil, then with the maple syrup. Season with salt and pepper, making sure some of the seasoning gets inside the cuts. Rub the minced garlic over the potatoes, pushing some of it into the cuts in the potatoes.
  3. Light a medium-sized fire in the grill.
  4. Brush the slices of onion on either side with oil and maple syrup, season them on each side, then slip one slice into each cut in the potato, pushing them down as far as you can. Slip a bay leaf into each slit of the potato, alongside the onion slices. Season the potatoes all over with salt and pepper.
    Brush the slices of onion on either side with oil and maple syrup, season them on each side, then slip one slice into each cut in the potato, pushing them down as far as you can. Slip a bay leaf into each slit of the potato, alongside the onion slices. Season the potatoes all over with salt and pepper.
  5. Place the wood chips in a bowl and cover with water.
  6. Cut four large pieces of aluminum foil and set the potatoes in the center. Pour 2 teaspoons of water around each potato, then seal the packets. When the coals are red and dusted with ash, divide them in the barbecue, putting half the coals on either side. Place the grill over the coals.
    Cut four large pieces of aluminum foil and set the potatoes in the center. Pour 2 teaspoons of water around each potato, then seal the packets. When the coals are red and dusted with ash, divide them in the barbecue, putting half the coals on either side. Place the grill over the coals.
  7. When the grill is hot, place the potato packets in the center of the grill and close the top. The temperature should rise to about 400F (200C). Cook the potatoes for 20 minutes, then check them for doneness. The potatoes should be nearly tender. Open the packets, and then drain the wood chips and place them on the hot coals. Close the grill and continue cooking the potatoes until they are tender through, 10 to 15 additional minutes. Remove the potatoes from the grill and transfer them from the foil to a serving platter or four warmed plates.
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8 Responses to Stuffed Potatoes on the Grill

  1. Pairing maple syrup and potatoes is a new concept to me. I can’t wait to try it. And thanks for the reminder to buy a bay tree as it has been on my to-do list far too long.

  2. Laura says:

    I encounter bay laurel on my walks through the California countryside. These potatoes are on my list for dinner this week!

    • Susan says:

      Laura – make sure the bay leaves are laurus nobilis. California bay is bitter; the leaves are long and skinny too. You can tell by picking one and smelling it – if it’s sweet and floral, you’ve got the right bay!

  3. Jessica says:

    Ok, you got me! I really want to make these potatoes. My family is going to be thankful for you! 🙂

  4. Trinjia Dell'Aglio says:

    Can’t wait to try this! It sounds so interesting with the mix of sweet and smokey. Yum!

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